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Anzac Memories: Living with the Legend [New Edition]

APPENDIX 2

BRIEF DETAILS OF INTERVIEWEES

Percy Bird (born 1889) grew up in Williamstown and was a clerk with the Victorian railways when he enlisted in 1915. He served on the Western Front with the 5th Battalion until he was wounded and repatriated to Australia in 1917. Upon returning to Williamstown he rejoined the railways and was a senior officer in the Auditing Department at retirement.

Harold Blake (c. 1898) was working in a chemist’s shop in Ballarat when he joined the navy in 1914. After service on HMAS Australia during the war he was based at Victoria Barracks in Melbourne until the end of his seven year’s naval service, and then worked in a chocolate factory.

Charles Bowden (1888) grew up in the Gippsland bush and then joined the Victorian railways. After enlistment in 1916 he served on the Western Front with the Australian Broad Gauge Railway Operating Division of the Royal Engineers. Back in Australia he worked with the railways and the State Public Service.

Bill Bridgeman (1893) went to sea in 1912 and served on HMAS Sydney for the duration of the war. Between the wars he was employed by the Harbour Trust in Williamstown, and in 1939 he had a compulsory call-up for the navy.

E. L. Cuddeford (1897) grew up on his parents’ sheep station near Albury and was apprenticed to a Sydney engineering company when he enlisted in the early years of the war. He served as a despatch runner with the 9th Battalion on the Western Front, and returned to skilled factory and engineering work after the war.

Stan D’Altera (1897) was an apprentice fitter and turner in a Yarraville factory when he enlisted in 1915. He served with the 23rd Battalion on Gallipoli, and with his brother in the 7th Battalion on the Western Front, until an injury required him to return to Australia in 1917. In the inter-war years he mixed casual labouring work with occasional journalism, and became active in unemployed politics and the Yarraville Citizen’s Club.

Leslie David (1896) was employed as a clerical worker with the Victorian railways when he enlisted in 1917. He spent the war working as a clerk in an Australian military camp in England, and returned home to a successful career with the railways.

Fred Farrall (1897) grew up on his parents’ small-holding in the Riverina and joined a ‘Kangaroo’ enlistment march in 1915. He served with the 55th Battalion on the Western Front, where he suffered a number of wounds and illnesses. In and out of factory work in the inter-war years, he became active in the Labor movement and a leading figure in Sydney and Melbourne radical politics.

Jack Flannery (c. 1898) was working as a farm labourer in Tasmania when he joined the 12th Battalion for service at Gallipoli and the Western Front. After the war he moved from farm work in Tasmania to quarry jobs in Melbourne.

Percy Fogarty (1897) grew up in a single parent family in rural Victoria and Yarraville, and enlisted in 1915. On the Western Front he served in the 22nd Battalion and the 5th Pioneer Brigade. After many different postwar jobs he eventually settled at labouring work in a flour mill in Kensington, where he remained until retirement.

Jack Glew (c. 1894) was a farm worker in the Western District of Victoria when he joined the Light Horse Brigade. After service on Gallipoli he transferred to the infantry and served on the Western Front. In the inter-war years he was often unemployed between labouring jobs.

Doug Guthrie (1901) worked with his father on the land and in road and rail-making contract work in Tasmania before he joined the navy just after the Armistice in 1918. Between the wars he worked with the Harbour Trust in Melbourne and the Metropolitan Gas Company, and in 1939 he was called up for further service in the navy.

Bill Langham (1897) ran away from his home in rural Victoria to work as a stable-hand at Caulfield Racecourse. During the war he served on the Western Front as a horse driver with an artillery unit of the 8th Brigade. Wounded just before the Armistice he returned to intermittent work in Melbourne until he settled at a job with the Melbourne City Council.

Albert Linton (1899) grew up in the Tasmanian bush and came to Melbourne for factory work and football. After enlistment in August 1914 he was discharged for being under-age and then re-enlisted in Tasmania. He served with the 31st Battalion on the Western Front until he was wounded at Ypres in 1917. After government retraining in Melbourne he returned to factory work.

A. J. McGillivray (1898) enlisted from rural Victoria in 1916 and served with the 29th Battalion on the Western Front until he was wounded in July 1918. After the war he took up a successful soldier settlement in Gippsland, but re-enlisted in 1939 and became a Japanese prisoner of war after the fall of Singapore.

Ted McKenzie (1890) was an apprentice carriage builder when he enlisted in the early months of the war to serve with the 24th Battalion at Gallipoli and on the Western Front. He completed his apprenticeship after the war and worked for forty-three years at H. V. McKay’s Sunshine Harvester Works.

James McNair (c. 1891) was working with the Melbourne Post Office when he joined reinforcements for the 14th Battalion in 1916. Following service on the Western Front he returned to work with the Postmaster General’s Department until retirement in 1956.

Ern Morton (c. 1896) grew up at Dookie Agricultural College and was a farm worker when he joined the 6th Light Horse Brigade at the outbreak of war. After service on Gallipoli he transferred to a Machine Gun Company of the 2nd Battalion and fought on the Western Front until he was wounded in 1918. After the war he trained to become a town clerk in a number of Victorian towns, and for a time was the Labor representative for the seat of Ripon in the Victorian Parliament.

Sid Norris (c. 1894) joined the 19th Battalion when he could no longer find work as a farm labourer in southern New South Wales. He served on the Western Front until he was wounded near the end of the war. Unable to find work upon his return to Sydney he went cane cutting in north Queensland, where he became active in the Australian Worker’s Union and Communist Party politics.

Alf Stabb (1895) was employed by the Victorian railways when he enlisted in February 1916. After service on the Western Front he returned to Melbourne with a wartime bride who had been the sister of an English soldier friend, and took up his pre-war employment.

Bill Williams (pseudonym) worked with his father’s Victorian land agency before joining a unit of reinforcements for the 23rd Battalion and serving at Gallipoli and on the Western Front. After recovering from wounds he established himself as a self-employed businessman.

Anzac Memories: Living with the Legend [New Edition]

   by Alistair Thomson